Last edited by Mall
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

3 edition of Women in pastoral societies in East and West Africa found in the catalog.

Women in pastoral societies in East and West Africa

Susan P. Joekes

Women in pastoral societies in East and West Africa

by Susan P. Joekes

  • 189 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by IIED, International Institute for Environment and Development in London, England .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Africa, East,
  • Africa, West
    • Subjects:
    • Rural women -- Africa, East -- Economic conditions.,
    • Rural women -- Africa, East -- Social conditions.,
    • Rural women -- Africa, West -- Economic conditions.,
    • Rural women -- Africa, West -- Social conditions.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementSusan Joekes, Judy Pointing.
      SeriesIssues paper / Dryland Networks Programme ;, paper no. 28, Issues paper (Dryland Networks Programme) ;, paper no. 28.
      ContributionsPointing, Judy.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHQ1788 .J64 1991
      The Physical Object
      Pagination30 p. ;
      Number of Pages30
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3779668M
      LC Control Number2003550491

        Pastoralism. Pastoralism is a subsistence pattern in which people make their living by tending herds of large animals. The species of animals vary with the region of the world, but they are all domesticated herbivores that normally live in herds and eat grasses or other abundant plant foods. Horses are the preferred species by most pastoralists in Mongolia and elsewhere in Central Asia. Regardless of the exact beginning, pastoral societies in Africa flourished across the north and through the Sahara region until the Sahara began to become dryer, a process historians estimate.

      In East Africa, for example, over 95% of cross-border trade is through unofficial channels and the unofficial trade of live cattle, camels, sheep and goats from Ethiopia sold to Somalia, Kenya and Djibouti generates an estimated total value of between US$ and US$ million annually ( times more than the official figure). The Sankofa Institute for African American Pastoral Leadership is committed to developing and supporting pastoral leaders, men and women of all races and backgrounds, for the African American Christian community within the context of the universal Christian mission of proclaiming the Good News of .

      West Africa's largest pastoral society. Had a major role in the 15th century. of a religiously based uprising. Vasco da Gama. Launched a voyage that took him around the tip of South Africa, along the East African coast and with the help of a Muslim pilot, across the Indian Ocean to Calicut in Southern India. A different kind of hunting. Women have been traditionally taking care of livestock in East African pastoral communities, eventually making their livestock much more valuable to them than any other in the community. For East African people, especially women and the ones that belong to the poor section of the society.


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Women in pastoral societies in East and West Africa by Susan P. Joekes Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Women in pastoral societies in East and West Africa. [Susan P Joekes; Judy Pointing]. Pastoralism and Climate Change in East Africa provides systematic and robust empirical investigations on the impact of climate change on pastoral production systems, as well as participating in the ongoing debate over the efficacy of traditional pastoralism.

This book is an initial product of the Project Building Knowledge to Support Climate Change Adaptation for Pastoralist Communities in. When it comes to leadership issues among women in societies in Africa, Kipuri and Ridgewell write of a “double bind” that excludes pastoral women from national leadership in the Horn of Africa and East Africa.

Specifically, the authors stressed Women in pastoral societies in East and West Africa book generally, pastoralists remain socially and economically marginalized and have little or no.

This book documents the importance of pastoralism as a way of life for over 25 million people in Africa. However, population increases, alienation of land, restrictions on migratory movements and a decline in rainfall have all made traditional forms of pastoralism difficult to sustain.

Chapter 2 covers the origins and spread of African pastoralism and the emergence of present-day pastoralist societies. Chapter 3 describes the environments inhabited by pastoralists, summarises the debate about equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems, and describes pastoral tenure arrangements.

The Pastoral and Environmental Network in the Horn of Africa (PENHA), with support from the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), has been contributing to the economic empowerment of women.

This program aims to promote gender equity and expand women and. Nomadic pastoralism was a result of the Neolithic revolution and the rise of that revolution, humans began domesticating animals and plants for food and started forming cities. Nomadism generally has existed in symbiosis with such settled cultures trading animal products (meat, hides, wool, cheese and other animal products) for manufactured items not produced by the nomadic.

L a s t u p d a t e d: S e p t e m b e r 2 0 1 1 These were states or societies which existed in Africa before the coming of the Europeans. The Africans had tried to forge political, social, and economic institutions for proper management of their.

Pastoralism gradually spread west across the southern Sahara, and then south, reaching the equator around B.C. and South Africa by the first centuries A.D. CELEP (The Coalition of European Lobbies for Eastern African Pastoralism) is the informal advocacy coalition of European organisations, associations and experts in partnership with pastoralist organisations, associations and experts in East Africa.'Veterinarians without Borders' and' Oxfam International' are also partners of this association.

The various organisations are working closely. Pastoralists of the West African Savanna book Selected Studies Presented and Discussed at the Fifteenth International African Seminar held at Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria, July Edited By Mahdi Adamu, A.

Kirk-Greene. An important edited volume that has a nice balance of East and West African coverage. The contributions cover topics such as trade, violence, and history. Homewood, Katherine. Ecology of African Pastoralist Societies. Oxford: James Currey, E-mail Citation» This probably is the most important current overview of African pastoralism.

policy directives for pastoral development in much of East Africa. These are failures of governance. Building the capacities of both pastoral commu-nities and their advocates to challenge these in-grained perceptions is an essential pre-requisite for the greater participation of pastoralists in national.

responsive to the uniqueness of the pastoral system are primarily to blame for pastoral vulnerability. The study on which this Synthesis Paper is based reviews current policies and practice towards pastoralism of governments, development agents and pastoral communities in the Horn and East Africa.

It also analyses the impact of current. The colonial experiences of pastoralist women have been largely ignored in the literature on Africa.

The paper focuses on pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial periods to locate the impact of colonization on pastoral women’s roles and social status using the example of Borana women of northern Kenya.

In this study, it is demonstrated that while the pre-colonial women of the Borana did. African Women: A Modern History. Boulder, CO: Westview, E-mail Citation» The author discusses the wide range of women’s positions (slavery, peasant, chief) in Africa’s diverse societies throughout the continent, noting that African women’s lives differed from those of Western women.

‘I hope your cattle are well’ (abere chemegi tuga chekug) is the greeting phrase of pastoral Kalenjin in Kenya, and reflects their special relationship with cattle.¹ In many African societies cattle are not only of great economic importance but also play an important role in the social and ritual are prestige items and ‘companions for life’, often occupying central.

nomadism / pastoral society / social change / social development / economic development / meteorology / drought / women / west africa / east africa: Categories: Sociology (General) Publication type: Book chapter: Language: English: About.

Pastoral Societies Many pastoral societies still exist in the modern world, particularly in Africa and in the Middle East.

In some areas crop cultivation was severely limited because of insufficient rainfall, too short a growing season, or mountainous terrain. Victor Azarya is Professor of Sociology and a Fellow of the Harry Truman Research Institute at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

He has published extensively on the Fulbe and on state-society relations in Africa. His latest book is Nomads in the State in Africa: the Political Roots of Marginality (Ashgate, ). Anneke Breedveld, Ph.D. () in Linguistics, is a Research Fellow at Format: Hardcover.

benefits conferred by pastoral production systems, they are often denigrated as being archaic. [R1] On the African continent, despite these subjective views, pastoral systems are showing remarkable vitality.

Spread out from east to west, some 50 million herders and up to million agropastoralists live in arid and semi-arid zones in Africa.

The book is beautifully produced and is highly recommended for scholars of pastoralist systems in Africa, as well as for those elsewhere who might turn to the African case for deeper insight into the successes, failures and futures of pastoralist societies worldwide.” Azania: Archaeological Research in Africa.This is because African societies, just like any other society, share the common ancestry which has led to the most unique characteristics, which is the ability to adapt the environment to suit the inhabitants.

For instance, Leakey () does indicate that the use of tools, the .